Where’s My Hammer?

I ask that question quite frequently. If not that exact question, then one of a similar nature.

  • Where’s my Hex wrenches?
  • Where’s my new scraper?
  • Who used my drill last and where did you leave it?
  • Would somebody please tell me where they left or hid the TV remote?

Last night (as I write this on Wednesday morning), it was my favorite blue-handled framing hammer missing from action. Eventually, after looking for something else, I found it in the bottom of a basket full of electric tools (said tools which haven’t been used by me in months). It was like somebody took everything out and laid it in the very bottom before piling it all back in.

Really?

Really!

Have you ever heard of the mischievous sock elves (the ones responsible for the one missing sock of a pair in the basket of freshly laundered clothes)? At my house, we also have the if-it-belongs-to-the-Dad-let’s-use-his-stuff-and-leave-it-in-obscure-places elves.

Whether your experiences are like mine or not (please don’t further depress me by telling me I am alone on this), we all value our stuff. Sometimes it’s because we paid good money for the things we own and the value derives from that. Sometimes the value is found in what the stuff is used for. And sometimes, the value of our stuff is based on sentimental worth. In my closet (which is often not safe from the I-need-a-pair-of-dress-socks-or-a-plain-white-T-shirt elves), there are two footlockers full of my Cole’s treasures. Inside are toy cars, ball caps, stuffed animals, assorted balls, and other things of little monetary worth. But because they were his, they are my treasures now. Others might see junk, but those things are of immeasurable worth to me.

In the great scheme of life, nothing we own of a physical nature has any lasting or eternal value. On the other hand, how we view our stuff does. In the guise of keeping it real, stinginess comes easy for me. But since stingy is never pretty, I must work hard at not holding on so tightly to my stuff. What helps me is seeing my stuff as tools. I can use my tools to serve myself, or I can use my tools to serve God and others. Serving God and others helps me recognize the true source of my stuff.

How about you? Got stuff? Where is your treasure?                           

Don’t store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy and where thieves break in and steal. But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust destroys, and where thieves don’t break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. (Matthew 6:19–21 CSB17)

Les, Jr.

 

Fools Gold

Now Peter and John were going up together to the temple complex at the hour of prayer at three in the afternoon. And a man who was lame from birth was carried there and placed every day at the temple gate called Beautiful, so he could beg from those entering the temple complex. When he saw Peter and John about to enter the temple complex, he asked for help. Peter, along with John, looked at him intently and said, “Look at us.” So he turned to them, expecting to get something from them. But Peter said, “I don’t have silver or gold, but what I have, I give you: In the name of Jesus Christ the Nazarene, get up and walk!” Then, taking him by the right hand he raised him up, and at once his feet and ankles became strong. So he jumped up, stood, and started to walk, and he entered the temple complex with them—walking, leaping, and praising God. All the people saw him walking and praising God, and they recognized that he was the one who used to sit and beg at the Beautiful Gate of the temple complex. So they were filled with awe and astonishment at what had happened to him. (Acts 3:1-10)

Hidden somewhere known only to me is a bag of silver.
A bag of silver.

When I was a little boy, my paternal grandfather used to give me silver dollars made of real silver. I still have them and over the years I have added to the collection with other silver dollars and silver dimes, nickels, quarters, and half-dollars as I have found them.

As small as it is, it’s not worth much money at all. And certainly not worth the effort to acquire it, but it is my bag of silver.
And it is real.

The world is busy offering lots of valuables to us, but most of the time those valuables have the equivalent of being fools gold.

They may appear beautiful. They may seem to be of great value… But in the end, the value they bring is not worth the time and effort…

Fools Gold.

In the long run, we strive for and pursue much, but anything of this world is fools gold.

A few years ago, I would have given anything to keep my son alive and here with me. Indeed, I miss him so… and while I have no desire to leave this life anytime soon, I am often conflicted. If my life takes the normal span, it will be years until I get to cross the great divide and see him again.

Yes, I miss my son.
Some days I yet weep for all the time that has to pass.
Some days my desperation is hard for others to imagine.
But having him back? Well to him who is safe, secure, and whole in the arms of Jesus? That would be fools gold.

And while I hesitate to make you see me in the same light as Peter and John, we do have something in common…

Like them I cannot give you any silver or gold, but if you are lame, broken, grieving, and hurting—as a result of the brokenness of this world as evidenced by your own sin or failures—or the sin and failures of others—I can give you Jesus… the only thing that matters!

Les, Jr.